• The James Bay I&I Reduction Pilot Project: Multiple Approaches to I&I Reduction that Yield Real Results

  • Project Components:
    Planning, Design, Conference Presentation, Construction, Project Management, Wastewater
The James Bay I&I Reduction Pilot Project: Multiple Approaches to I&I Reduction that Yield Real Results
2011 BC Water and Waste Association (BCWWA) conference

ABSTRACT

The James Bay neighbourhood of Victoria, BC has some of the oldest sewers in Western Canada. As part of the City of Victoria’s commitment to the Capital Regional District’s (CRD) Core Area Liquid Waste Management Plan, the City initiated the James Bay I&I Reduction Pilot Project in 2007. This project had a budget of approximately $3 million, and to date is the largest known I&I reduction project completed in British Columbia. The pilot project was a comprehensive initiative that included pre- and post-rehabilitation flow monitoring, CCTV, smoke and dye testing, a multi-approach construction program that featured both public and private sewer rehabilitation, and a focus on trenchless technology. This presentation will include an overview of the planning, construction and evaluation of the I&I project, including the development of an I&I blueprint for future I&I reduction initiatives. The audience will learn how up to 60% I&I reduction was achieved in both public and private sewer rehabilitation.

Key learning points are:

  • Develop a structured approach to planning I&I reduction projects;
  • Manage construction through challenging site conditions with multiple rehabilitation approaches;
  • Evaluate I&I reduction programs using a range of measures, including the I&I Envelope method;

BIOGRAPHY

Mike Homenuke has been with KWL for seven years since graduating from UBC, and specializes in GIS-based municipal infrastructure analysis and planning, with a focus on sanitary sewer systems and energy resources. His recent work includes development of sewer system hydraulic models, capital plans, and sewer rehabilitation and I&I reduction programs.

Resources: 
Presentation (application/pdf, 2.403Mb)